Low Histamine “Pumpkin” Mousse Recipe

Low Histamine Pumpkin Recipe

A low histamine twist on a typical holiday pumpkin recipe

Low Histamine Pumpkin Recipe

            Pumpkin is such a staple for the holidays - but, pumpkin can, unfortunately, aggravate histamine symptoms. So, to cater to the histamine intolerant, I've got a low histamine "pumpkin" mousse recipe that's made with a friendly alternative: butternut squash! 

If you're looking to squash symptoms and still enjoy the tastes of the holidays, let's get low with this low histamine recipe and start making mousse!

But first, let's check out the breakdown of why I've chosen ingredients and how they can help your histamine intolerance symptoms.

Low Histamine "Pumpkin" Mousse Recipe: Ingredients Breakdown

Maple Syrup: Sweetening with maple syrup or raw, local honey are excellent options for keeping things low-histamine. Additionally, the use of local honey has shown to help in taming histamine symptoms. 

Vanilla: Who doesn't love vanilla? Did you know that vanilla even tricks the taste buds into thinking a dessert is sweeter than it actually is! Just a small amount will do the trick - but, keep in mind that typical vanilla extracts contain alcohol which can destabilize mast cells and produce histamine symptoms. Grabbing an alcohol-free vanilla from your local health food store is a great investment as vanilla lasts a long time due to the very small amounts necessary in recipes.

Coconut milk: Keeping this recipe dairy-free with coconut milk will also help to prevent symptoms, as dairy can encourage digestive distress, as and may even destabilize mast cells. Additionally, coconut provides a healthy dose of fats to encourage bile release and boost digestive power!

Ginger: Ginger is actually an anti-histamine food and can reduce histamine intolerance symptoms. However, keep in mind it does contain salicylate which some histamine intolerant individuals may be sensitive to. If you are also sensitive to salicylates, simply omit ginger from the recipe. Remember, fresh is always best when it comes to using herbs and spices - so aim for fresh ginger in this recipe!

As you can see, I've done my research on this low histamine "pumpkin" mousse recipe! For a full list of the best foods to eat for histamine intolerance and other strategies to reduce symptoms, download my guide to histamine intolerance which also contains a comprehensive histamine intolerance foods list

Low Histamine “Pumpkin” Coconut Mousse Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups butternut squash, roasted and pureed
  • ⅓ cup maple syrup/ raw, local honey
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract (alcohol-free)
  • ¼ tsp. fresh ginger, micro-planed
  • 1 can full fat coconut milk

Directions:

  1. The night before you go to make this, place an unopened can of coconut milk in the fridge.
  2. The next morning, open the can and scoop out the solid white part and place it in the mixture.
  3. Using a hand mixer, whip the coconut into a whipped cream.
  4. Next, make the squash mixture - In another bowl, combine the squash, ginger and maple syrup and mix well.
  5. Gently fold the whipped coconut cream it into the squash mixture.
  6. Chill in the fridge until it is ready to be eaten.

How did you like this low histamine twist on a holiday pumpkin recipe? Let us know in the comments below!

Want more low histamine recipes like this? Check out my nutritionist-approved Low Histamine Cookbook with 110 delicious histamine intolerance recipes!  

Life's too short to let symptoms control you.

Your histamine intolerance expert,

Anita


References

1. Balch PA. Prescription for Nutritional Healing. 4th ed. Avery, editor. London: Penguin Group; 2006. 980 p.

2. Ede G. Histamine Intolerance: why freshness matters. J Evol Heal. 2017;2(1):11.

3. Stockinger, B., Meglio, P., Gialitakis, M. and Duarte, J. (2014). The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor: Multitasking in the Immune System. Annual Review of Immunology, 32(1), pp.403-432.

4. Hoffman BD. What is Mast Cell Activation Syndrome ? Hoffman Centre for Integrative and Functional Medicine. 2017.

5. Maintz L, Novak N. Histamine and histamine intolerance. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007;85(5):1185–96.

6. Perreard M, Iconomidis N, Bernard C, Chayvialle J, Gerolami A. Effect of a low-fat diet on the fasting volume and postprandial emptying of the gallbladder. Gastroenterol Clin Biol. 1993;17(6-7):435-40.


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Anita Tee, Msc

Anita Tee is a highly qualified and published nutritional scientist, carrying a Master of Science in Personalized Nutrition and a Bachelor of Science in Human Biology, specializing in Genetic & Molecular Biology.

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